First Blood: The Pratt Street Riot

(A version of this article originally appeared in the Johns Hopkins News-Letter on April 14, 2011.)

On April 19, 1861, four days after the surrender of Fort Sumter and 86 years to the day after the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the City of Baltimore witnessed an outbreak of violence that resulted in the first combat deaths of the American Civil War.
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April 4, 1865: Lincoln Enters the City of Traitors

President Abraham Lincoln entered Richmond, Virginia on April 4, 1865, a day after the Confederate capital had fallen to the forces of the United States. He was accompanied by Rear Admiral David D. Porter, a handful of officers, a small escort of sailors, and his son Tad, whose twelfth birthday it was.
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History Matters

Lafayette

Most Americans know that the Marquis de Lafayette and thousands of other Frenchmen helped us secure our independence. (Library of Congress)

Earlier this week, Jared Kushner’s father-in-law was in Paris to take part in France’s annual celebration of Bastille Day as a guest of President Emmanuel Macron. While holding a joint press conference with Macron, the prolific tweeter who lost the popular vote last November proved that he does not need to be in the United States to embarrass the United States. He remarked that “France is America’s first and oldest ally. A lot of people don’t know that.” He went on to add that “France helped us secure our independence, a lot of people forget.”

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Why You Should Celebrate the Fourth of July

As I have written, the United States of America declared independence from Great Britain on July 2, 1776. The Fourth of July is not America’s birthday. That being said, July 4 is, nonetheless, a day worthy of celebration. After all, it was on July 4, 1776 that the United States became, in the world of Lincoln, a nation “conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

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